Published by Penguin Books.
 Rating: /5

I was so excited to start this book, but unfortunately it took me quite a while to get into it. Whether that has something to do with outside influences, I don't know. In the end I actually really enjoyed it. The story wasn't what I expected, and I think that is why I struggled with it in the beginning. This being said, I did love it. It was definitely an interesting re-envisioning of the fairy tale classic, 'Cinderella', but there was only very few references to it, and they were obscure ones at that. For example, at the end of the book as Cinder is trying to escape the palace she loses her Cyborg leg instead of the traditional glass slipper.

** Spoiler Alert **

And the premise of the book is exactly that. The story is set in an imaginary country called 'New Bejing', the capital of the Eastern Commonwealth, a country ravaged by plague outbreaks. Although, one thing that was apparent throughout the novel was that; even though it was set in a futuristic China, there seemed to be a distinct lack of Eastern cultures and customs.  Maybe it was set so far in the future that these sort of things don't exist anymore? Who knows!

The protagonist is a half cyborg, half human called Linh - Cinder, who works as a mechanic to fund the lifestyle of her 'evil' step mum and her two sisters. However, Cinder isn't completely on her own, in place of her troupe of mice and birds is a reliable robot. However, one day, the heir to the throne of the Commonwealth, Prince Kai, steps into Cinder's shop to get his android fixed, and everything changes for Cinder.

From this point, the narrative unfolds in a series of misfortunate events, including the infection, and eventual death of the more likeable of Cinder's two sisters, and Cinder being seized and brought to the palace as she appears to possess the cure to the Luna plague that is killing Earth's citizens.

As much as I enjoyed the darker side to this novel in the form of the Luna's, as a reader you don't really gain a full understanding of them. Like, who or what are the Lunar's? How did they get there? How do they live on the Moon? Why exactly are they at war with Earth? I still have no clue.

There is still some entertainment value to Cinder. I did continue to read purely to find out how the story unfolds, only to reach the end and find a cliff hanger. So frustrating! Although, you can kind of predict the novel's outcome around 100 pages in. I will, inevitably, read the rest of the series but I don't have the usual desire to start it right away.

Love, Jo.



Published by Penguin Books.
 Rating: /5

I was so excited to start this book, but unfortunately it took me quite a while to get into it. Whether that has something to do with outside influences, I don't know. In the end I actually really enjoyed it. The story wasn't what I expected, and I think that is why I struggled with it in the beginning. This being said, I did love it. It was definitely an interesting re-envisioning of the fairy tale classic, 'Cinderella', but there was only very few references to it, and they were obscure ones at that. For example, at the end of the book as Cinder is trying to escape the palace she loses her Cyborg leg instead of the traditional glass slipper.

** Spoiler Alert **

And the premise of the book is exactly that. The story is set in an imaginary country called 'New Bejing', the capital of the Eastern Commonwealth, a country ravaged by plague outbreaks. Although, one thing that was apparent throughout the novel was that; even though it was set in a futuristic China, there seemed to be a distinct lack of Eastern cultures and customs.  Maybe it was set so far in the future that these sort of things don't exist anymore? Who knows!

The protagonist is a half cyborg, half human called Linh - Cinder, who works as a mechanic to fund the lifestyle of her 'evil' step mum and her two sisters. However, Cinder isn't completely on her own, in place of her troupe of mice and birds is a reliable robot. However, one day, the heir to the throne of the Commonwealth, Prince Kai, steps into Cinder's shop to get his android fixed, and everything changes for Cinder.

From this point, the narrative unfolds in a series of misfortunate events, including the infection, and eventual death of the more likeable of Cinder's two sisters, and Cinder being seized and brought to the palace as she appears to possess the cure to the Luna plague that is killing Earth's citizens.

As much as I enjoyed the darker side to this novel in the form of the Luna's, as a reader you don't really gain a full understanding of them. Like, who or what are the Lunar's? How did they get there? How do they live on the Moon? Why exactly are they at war with Earth? I still have no clue.

There is still some entertainment value to Cinder. I did continue to read purely to find out how the story unfolds, only to reach the end and find a cliff hanger. So frustrating! Although, you can kind of predict the novel's outcome around 100 pages in. I will, inevitably, read the rest of the series but I don't have the usual desire to start it right away.

Love, Jo.



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